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Hitchhiking around Europe

Scandinavia, Germany, Soviet Union, Bulgaria, Greece, Turkey and Yugoslavia

Hitchhiking around Europe
Hitchhiking around Europe
Hitchhiking around Europe
Hitchhiking around Europe
Hitchhiking around Europe

Scandinavia, Germany, Soviet Union, Bulgaria, Greece, Turkey and Yugoslavia

I met Jurek at the beginning of the studies, Philosophy Studies at the University of Warsaw, more precisely. We started our journey from the flight to Leningrad. For me it was an encounter with a country known from Russian literature, including Dostoyevsky. We slept in Angleterre Hotel (Internacjonal), where Sergey Yesenin committed suicide. 

We went from Leningrad to Tallin by train. We did not get tickets, however, we managed to jump in. A woman taxi driver in tallinn asked us to greet Polish laborers.

The ferry to Helsinki was our next means of transport. In Tallinn we bought mango squash for the journey. We were so fed up with it that we promised to each other never to drink it again. 

We continued from Helsinki by hitchhiking to Stockholm. The next stops of our trip were Helsingor in Denmark, Copenhagen, Hamburg and East Berlin from which we returned to Leningrad where we left some part of our luggage. But this was not the end of our journey! We took a plane to Moscow and from Moscow a train to Romania and Bulgaria, from where we continued to Thessaloniki and Athens by hitchhiking. When we were in the capital city of Greece, we, the students of Philosophy, experienced something extraordinary - we slept three nights in sleeping bags on Acropolis, and more precisely, on the agora. I remember talking to Greek communist who were persuading us that one make of cars would be enough. They knew communism from theory and had no idea about the reality. We both knew well that it was good to have a choice... We were picked up by different people on that journey so we had opportunity to hear different, left- and right wing, views. 

From Greece we reached Istanbul where the truck drivers were recommending us to go to Iran. We came back, however, to Greece, from where we went to Yugoslavia and then to Bulgaria and returned to Poland by train. We were on the road for almost three months, from July to October, in a different place every several days. We were exploring famous historical places. 

It was after that journey that Europe became too tight for us. We started to think about a further expedition. Mexico seemed suitable in terms of learning history and broadening our horizons.